Entrepreneurship, prison, big pharma and meth

The sticky connection between smoking pot and being a super successful entrepreneur | Fast Company

Entrepreneurs were more likely to engage in what the authors dubbed “illicit activities” in the days of their wild youth, with teenage pastimes like shoplifting, playing hooky, assault, drug dealing, and smoking marijuana.

“The combination of ‘smarts’ and ‘aggressive/illicit/risk-taking’ tendencies as a youth accounts for both entry into entrepreneurship and the comparative earnings of entrepreneurs,” the authors note.

Should we allow prisoners to smoke weed? | The Week

A recent survey conducted by the International Journal of Drug Policy suggests marijuana consumption could lead to more peaceful prison conditions. The study, which focused on Swiss prisons, reveals that about 80 percent of prisoners and 50 percent of guards smoke pot. The Journal concluded:

Participants showed similar opinions on effects of cannabis use that were described both at individual and institutional levels: analgesic, calming, self-help to go through the prison experience, relieve stress, facilitate sleep, prevent violence, and social pacifier. 

Merchants of Meth: How Big Pharma Keeps the Cooks in Business | The Atlantic

Since 2007, the number of clandestine meth sites discovered by police has increased 63 percent nationwide. In Kentucky, the number of labs has more than tripled. The Bluegrass State regularly joins its neighbors Missouri, Tennessee, and Indiana as the top four states for annual meth lab discoveries.

As law enforcement agencies scramble to clean up and dispose of toxic labs, prosecute cooks, and find foster homes for their children, they are waging two battles: one against destitute, strung-out addicts, the other against some of the world’s wealthiest and most politically connected drug manufacturers.

$1B of meth stopped at New Zealand border | TV3 News

Up to $1 billion of methamphetamine and precursor drugs has been intercepted at the New Zealand border since 2009. Customs Minister Maurice Williamson says 66kgs of methamphetamine and 3.3 tonnes of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine has been stopped. The street value of the drugs is estimated to be between $740 million and $1b and the seizures have prevented $410m of “drug harm”, Mr Williamson says.

China is New Zealand’s primary source of methamphetamine precursors and Mr Williamson says cooperation [with China], which included sharing information and intelligence, has paid dividends. Methamphetamine use has decreased from 2.2 percent in 2007/08 to 0.9 percent in late 2012.

Did you know?

In New Zealand 49.0% of people aged 16–64 years have used drugs for recreational purposes at some time: about 1,292,700 people. Most used cannabis ( 46.4%).

In 2007/08 one in six (16.6%) adults had used ‘any drugs’ for recreational purposes: 438,200 people. Cannabis (14.6%), BZP party pills (5.6%), ecstasy (2.6%), amphetamines (2.1%) and LSD and other synthetic hallucinogens (1.3%) were the most common.

In 2011/12, most adults had consumed alcohol in the past 12 months (80%). One in five (19%) had hazardous drinking patterns; about 532,000 people.