Back doors, mobile phones, persuasion: the NSA does it all

This is an old post but I’m leaving it here for the hell of it. Failed links have been updated (where possible) or removed.

The headlines about the NSA just keep on coming…

N.S.A. Foils Much Internet Encryption | NY Times
The National Security Agency is winning its long-running secret war on encryption, using supercomputers, technical trickery, court orders and behind-the-scenes persuasion to undermine the major tools protecting the privacy of everyday communications in the Internet age, according to newly disclosed documents.

Most 2006-2009 NSA queries of a phone database broke court rules | Reuters
The National Security Agency routinely violated court-ordered privacy protections between 2006 and 2009 by examining phone numbers without sufficient intelligence tying them to associates of suspected terrorists, according to U.S. officials and documents that were declassified on Tuesday.

Privacy Scandal: NSA Can Spy on Smart Phone Data | Spiegel
SPIEGEL has learned from internal NSA documents that the US intelligence agency has the capability of tapping user data from the iPhone, devices using Android as well as BlackBerry, a system previously believed to be highly secure.

NSA shares raw intelligence including Americans’ data with Israel | Guardian
The National Security Agency routinely shares raw intelligence data with Israel without first sifting it to remove information about US citizens, a top-secret document provided to the Guardian by whistleblower Edward Snowden reveals.

Google encrypts data amid backlash against NSA spying | Washington Post
Google is racing to encrypt the torrents of information that flow among its data centers around the world in a bid to thwart snooping by the NSA and the intelligence agencies of foreign governments, company officials said.

Drug Agents Use Vast Phone Trove, Eclipsing N.S.A.’s | NY Times
For at least six years, law enforcement officials working on a counternarcotics program have had routine access, using subpoenas, to an enormous AT&T database that contains the records of decades of Americans’ phone calls — parallel to but covering a far longer time than the National Security Agency’s hotly disputed collection of phone call logs.

The US government has betrayed the internet. We need to take it back | Guardian
We need to know how exactly how the NSA and other agencies are subverting routers, switches, the internet backbone, encryption technologies and cloud systems. I already have five stories from people like you, and I’ve just started collecting. I want 50. There’s safety in numbers, and this form of civil disobedience is the moral thing to do.

Part 3: Verifying Keys | Keith Ng’s how-to series on encryption | Public Address
So there’s a public key on my page. How do you know that’s *my* key? Anyone could have created that key, just like I created the John PGPKey key. For all you know, some Russian hacker could have taken over Public Address and put that key there. As a first step, you should look up my key. My key is published, so you can go to this keyserver and look up it up using my name.